Meet Danni and find out her reason for training as a Higher Level Teaching Assistant

Hey everyone My name is Danni and I’ve recently decided to become a Higher Level Teaching Assistant. I’ve been invited by RagHeroes to guest blog for them whilst completing my training. I’m really happy to do this. My aim is to share with other parents what I am learning, with the view to that it might help a few people along the way 🙂 About me Being a stay at home mummy for 6 years has been amazing. I love looking after my little family consisting of B 6years), who is a little princess and M (3 years), who is a little charmer, and of course my newlywed husband Richard. I love my family more than anything and would do anything for them. My hubby works full time and long hours, so I do the school runs, cleaning and cooking, etc. You know – everything what a stay at home mummy does right! I’m also fully qualified hair and beauty therapist, however, working in a salon would not be possible with small children as my partner leaves for work before school and arrives home after school finishes. Plus there’s all the school holidays to think about. So that’s why I’ve made the decision to train as a Higher Level Teaching Assistant including working with disabilities and learning difficulties in children from 0 to 18 yrs. I’m currently doing my training now and I’m so happy. I’ve got a placement at my children’s school. M will be starting the nursery there soon so this works out perfect for me as I’ll be going to work and leaving the same times...

My child is NOT a Robot!

This is a guest post submitted by Diane Wilkinson from The Creation Station, Northumberland. Diane provides arts and crafts classes, parties and events for children. She is a qualified early years teacher and has worked with children and families for over 25 years in homes, early years settings and schools. She is also a mum to Kimberley who just turned 8 🙂 I’ve been reading a lot of articles lately about how the Government is trying to improve the education of our youngest children and it stirs up a lot of emotions for me. As a former nursery manager and early years teacher it angers me that those in power often have no direct experience of working within the Early Years sector, let alone any relevant qualifications. As a parent it makes me sad that our children are being cared for and educated by a workforce pressurised by constant change, demands to meet arbitrary targets, mountains of paperwork and very little financial reward for what is arguably one of the most important roles in our society. In the latest reports from Ofsted (the Office for Standards in Education who inspect and regulate childcare as well as schools) it seems that early years workers are again at fault for failing to prepare children properly for school. But I would argue that it is not our early years settings who are at fault, rather our whole education system which is built on the premise of “the earlier the better” for the teaching of formal skills such as reading and writing.   There are innumerable studies and reports on the education systems...